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the various instruments are going to be used. science teams working together for five or ten years or more interpret the data that returns and discuss which of the engineers what is interesting and possible to do next. so, at its heart the story of the planetary exploration today is about the relation of people and robotic spacecraft. machines never actually complex laboratory capable of operating in extreme cold with little power package to handle the vibrations and worked for years without repair. sending the scientific instruments throughout the solar system is one of the great successes of the computer age, and there will surely marked our place in history and science and exploration but these missions also show that we understand how to design machines and organize people so everything fits and that's my story today about the exploration rovers how the design of the spacecraft as you see mer, the organization of people, the software tools and the schedule makes it possible for scientists to work on mars. in the skill of the universe, mars is next door about nine months travel using co
and around the world, harmonize science-based standards, utilize risk-based monitoring and inspection, improve global surveillance, preparedness and emergency response, and to advance regulatory science. also, two years ago i told you that drug security was a top priority at fda. well, we now have the office of drug security integrity and recall that is located in cedar's office of compliance, up and running, playing the resources of strategies to the problems of counterfeiting, intentional adulteration, diversion, cargo theft, and other threats to the drug supply chain. but perhaps most important development is the passage of the food and drug administrations safety and innovation act of 2012, or what we fondly called fdasi. to improve patient access to new and better treatments, and to alleviate drug some shortages. fdasia also gives the fda important new authorities to protect the integrity of the to -- drug supply chain. thanks to fdasia we will receive enhanced information about drug manufacturers and the establishment and have the authority to develop a risk-based scheduled to i
science team. increasingly that sort of function is becoming a core function of the campaign. used to be to the extension of data it was left for fund-raising or you could buy vendors our consultants. and now, you know, people will have call them different things but there's basically the core function of a modern campaign to people, especially on the photo site, just crushing and processing data. >> if any of us were to go to the romney campaign or the obama campaign and where to look around the headquarters, how many people, is there a lot of young staff? what does it look like? >> guest: chicago, dozens of people depending i had how you define it, analytics him and then in every state they are hiring for jobs that are dated jobs, voter file managers, targeting directors, that's, you, the obama campaign will have thousands around the country and i guess hundreds of them are directly interacting with the data everyday. >> host: do you think one of the parties, republicans or the democrats, is more adept at using this technique? or are they all sort of at the same level? >> guest:
science on earth. and this is an odd kind of expedition for another reason. usually scientists go off in different directions, different times using their own tools. for mer the entire team was all together. 150 scientists and engineers balancing together, as it were, like on a huge skateboard creeping over the sand, up the down and hills and craters meters at a time for eight years. so it's something like being on a ship, on an early voyageover discovery. the scientists and the sailing crew were all having to travel together. they had to negotiate how long are we going to stay here in where are we going to go next in and what should we do at each site? and this requires a well coordinated understanding of their roles, schedules, resources, long-term plans and a clear chain of command. if you visited the science and engineering coordination meeting during the prime mission, which was the first 90 days of landing on mars in 2004, same thing we're going through now with curiosity during these 90 days, you could see the scientists up front on the bridge, as it were, with huge displays of
in education. you see more young men majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace you see more women going into nonprofits. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more men and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man an and a woman in an investment bank, face both start at goldman sachs, those should be paid to sing. they are paid the same. if they are not there are avenues to pursue, but that's a big difference. >> what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> well, i think the white house needs have a council on men and boys. you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less e
-selling science writer will talk about the cyberworld, popular culture and computer networking as a political tool. mr. johnson is the author of eight nonfiction books including every name, were good ideas come from an the 2012 release, future perfect. >> host: steven johnson come in your newest book, in a network age, use those term pre-progressive. what is that? >> guest: it is my attempt to come up with a term for this new political philosophy that i see emerging all around me. the book is really people who are trying to change the world in trying to ban progress, but he don't completely fit the existing models that we have between the left in the right or democrats and republicans. they believe in many ways that the way the internet was built, the way the web was built, the way things that wikipedia were built, using these collaborative. the works, where people come together from different points of view and openly collaborating, building ideas, that that mechanism is a tremendous engine for progress and growth. but it doesn't necessarily involve a government and doesn't necessarily involve ca
, the ones who had really, you know, profound new ideas on science, had this interesting pattern where they, actually had a lot more kind of failed papers. and they published, they had far more volume to their work, and a huge number of those papers never went anywhere. it was every now and then, there would be one that would be incredible breakout hit and would change science forever, then most of the time they were starting out hitting like baseball a short little ground out whereas the none in -- noninnovative thinkers, who hadn't had disruptive idea, they were just hitting kind of singles and were much more consistent, had higher batting average but weren't swinging for the fences. so the argument is that to really be kind of successful in a new way and open up a new door or possibility in your field or science or some other field you have to have tolerance for failure and error. that is one of the things we see in silicon valley. is that that is if you're an entrepreneur in silicon valley and you haven't had at least one failed startup people look at you strangely. you're supposed to t
scouting out locations or a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." this is about 30 minutes. >> if we could have everybody in the back come on up that's going to join us. thank you so much for your patience. the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block was around as. apparently -- thank you. people are nodding, so that's good. thank you very much. there may be some people still held up and we will welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter earnest, executive director and i'll ask you as a courtesy, to those for recording the program and to the speakers, the kind enough to turn off your cell phones, pdas and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. well, it's wonderful to see all of you here for the signing, and as we kick off the signing, i will show you a clip of the film based on the book for which you came to attempt the signing. so with that said we will go right ahead and come up and do the interview with tony. >> [inaudible] >> has shocked the civilized world. more than 60 american citizens continue to be held as hostages. >> six
a carcinogen in their bodies. >> i would go back to medical fact and science. according to evidence based medicine. >> this is the world health organization. >> birth control is safe, and it is 90 percent effective. in relation to talking to the 13 and 15 year-old, we believe that is the role of a parent. what we do every single day is encourage parents to have conversations with their children. the vast majority of teenagers in texas want to hear from their parents about their bodies. planned parenthood de amelie teach your but the science. we hope you teach them about the immorality, your gun, and your views on science. again, we believe that all people have the right to scientifically based medically accurate information. [applause] >> hi. i'm laura. catholic wife of one, mother of two. i am here to give probably a different perspective about contraception and i hope to be a voice of a different option for all these beautiful men and women in the audience. i have been married for 20 years . i embrace the gift of the catholic teaching about contraception. the last 16, and fanatical and
of the new england institute for cognitive science, and he is cofounder of the new england institute for cognitive science, an evolutionary study. religious studies at the university of very good. he's been an unflagging student of how human beings make their way in the world, even though that way is often not pretty. he challenges each reader to tinker with their own wiring, to be aware, and he hopes to do better. for his profound insights into the human condition and into the conditions, some humans play some others, we present him the anisfield-wolf book award for nonfiction. [applause] ♪ the night this is wonderful and i deeply appreciate the fact that such a distinguished jury read my book, much less thought it worthy of this great honor. in a moment i am going to read you an excerpt from "less than human," which deals the course of the atrocities of the past. but i think it is useful to remind ourselves that the plaintiff considering atrocities that the path is to make a better future. if we can understand what has driven us to do the terrible thing we've done to our fellow h
to be less about public policy being guided by compromise and more about having it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having a view of the insured as a society and what as a society we gain from that. what of the consequences if we don't? if it has been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science is really being pushed out of some much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services that are based on the ranchers science. and that is a scary moment, regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal legal police are up at to what to require medical professionals to the mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country, and that in those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much m
location for a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." it's about thirty minutes. if we can have nerve the back come on. thank you for your patience. we have -- the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block here was horrendous. apparently thank you, people are nodding. that's good. thank you very much. so there may be some people held up still. we'll welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter, the executive directer. ly ask you as a court sei those who are recording the program and the speakers to be kind enough to turn off your cell phone, pda and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. that said we'll go ahead and come up and do the interview with tony. the people die. we want the six of them out. what we want is -- deliver the six by providing them with -- you can send them training wheels and get them to the board we are gatorade. it would take a miracle to get them out. what are we watching? i have an idea. there are canadian film crew for science fiction. we file together as a company. this is how we make a big movie. you want to c
&d, science-based a physical science-based breakthrough. most of it has come from commercialization of the internet which is not as scientific and research based as we typically think of as occurring in universities house of representatives my undergraduate degree is in electrical engineering and look what i'm doing. i take your point. i vaguely remember the three laws of dynamics. so yeah, i take your point but my point is less would've the undergraduate, i don't know we can argue but how important that is, but more, i take your point about the commercialization and the browsers and all that was definitely private, occasional borrowing for more basic research, but my point was that seems like a really critical element was sort of just was the critical mass of people out there, and the guys who founded google were guys who were getting their ph.d's at stanford, you know, and they developed an algorithm out of their training. and just the fact that she did have people working on systems engineering, and it's less the undergraduate but more the government finance, dod research, networ
does. a lot of people in here, remember the question in political science 101, should be elected representative do what he believes is right or what constituents because right? you could answer the question one way or the other. the important thing to take with them it is -- [inaudible] nobody wants to run for office so they can -- a robot into the you what to be a candidate because you believe in something. whatever you want to do. nobody wants you to just pull the lever for what the constituents you to do. so all a super pac and would do is identify places where the elected representative has gone too far from his constituency, and then educate the electorate about how the elected representative is sideways with the public opinion and the people. so you take that crossroads add, we're running it in all the states talk about the president has had this tennis program. testing this thing was wildly unpopular, and all the ads is hold the president or another elected official to account for what they did. it can't change public opinion about the stimulus legislation that we can iden
how we hire teachers. not to hire new math and science teachers and create 2 million more slots in our community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs out there right now. and i want to make sure we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree are corporate tax rate is too high, so i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing. taken it down to 25%. but i also want to close those loopholes that give incentives for companies shipping jobs overseas. i want to provide tax breaks for companies investing in the united states upon energy. governor romney and i both agree that we've got to boost american energy production and oil and natural gas production are higher than they have been in years. but i also believe that we've got to look at the energy sources of the future, like wind and solar and biofuels and make those investments. so, all of this is possible. now in order for us to do agree how to to close our deficit in one of the things we will discuss tonight is how do we do with our tax code and how do we make sur
at elon college majoring in international studies with all sorts of minors, political science, and she has worked with refugees and her region. she is the president of halal on her campus and the millennial values fellow so we are pleased that she is back. last but not least, mohammad usman is a senior at depauw university majoring in urban policy and conflict studies with a minor in religious studies. he was a part of the national bioethics bowl, the winning team in the last year so congratulations on that. and before attending depauw was a special assistant in advocate for acts of civil legal justice at the university of new york school of law. so welcome to all of them. i would like to hear from all of you, and last night when we heard governor romney talk about states as the laboratory of democracy so while that may have been a republican democrat comment it got me thinking about our mayor and the work that they do in their communities and i'm going to hand the floor over to them. if you could both talk a little bit about how you see the future of american politics. >> thank you for ha
of systems all of which are so important to the asia-pacific region. and we'll continue all of our science and technology investments across the board. the third reason why we can carry out the rebalance is that we're shifting our posture forward and into the asia-pacific region; that is, not what we have, but where we put it is also changing. by 2020 we will have shifted 60% of our naval assets to the pacific. that's an historic change for the be united states navy. the marine corps will have up to 2500 marines on rotation in australia, we will have four la toral combat ships stationed forward in singapore, i was just aboard both in san diego last week, and we'll proceed fully to build out our military presence on guam and surrounding areas, which is an important strategic hub for the western pacific. we will begin to rotate b-1 bombers into the region augmenting the b-52 bombers already on continuous rotation. we've already deployed f-22s to kadima air force base in japan, and we will deploy the f-35 joint strike fighter to the region. differently, we're sending our newest assets to the
woman elected to the senate in her own right. there was an article about what the science article written about 30 or 35 years ago about the women in congress and the title was over his dead body. and there's still quite a few women in congress who got their because their husbands die. some of the first women, she followed her husband who had died when the policy and then took that over. and so, kassebaum was the first one who would never followed the south. and now once again gave her a lot of tension. it is a very highly visible rays, covered even one of the london newspapers commented it the day after the election. q. we have one woman in the senate. if you're one woman you would get a lot of attention. two years after she was elected she was like one of the temperatures of the national convention. people were already touting her as a national force a national figure. and she had a lot going for her that i think they commanders should be undertaken if that's not presidential, at least vice presidential. that way she blended with what was said was talking about. those of you rem
years from 2007-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bard is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard," which he cofounded in 1995. prior to starting that he led the project for the republican future. he also served as chief of staff to vice president quayle and secretary of education bill bennett. he also served as foreign policy adviser to senator john mccain. i'm sure all of you see built regularly on "fox news sunday" and the fox news channel. i actually met bill in 1981 when he was a very young, assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. it's been great to see all the things he has accomplished since that time. so the questions i'd like to pose for each of you come and i'll start with governor huntsman, what does the 2012 election reveal about the respected leadership styles of obama and romney? >> probably not much at this point. >> well, this panel is over. [laughter] >>
was held up the wilson center in june on science and technology and innovation. the symposia, which the institute co-chairs foot china's state council, not only promote dialogue among the stakeholders but allow the participants to develop personal connections. the institute also recently released an initial report on u.s.-china security perceptions, and other big project we are working on with leading research institutions in the u.s. and beijing. just last month we published the u.s. cooperation and clean energy and the review of the difficulties both countries face in developing solar, wind and other alternative energy industries and the potential room for cooperation. last november, finally, henry participated in another one of our national conversations entitled afghanistan is there a regional and gamecocks the story on this is interesting. he resisted when he learned we get organized a brilliant panel of scholars and reporters to comment on his remarks to the and we hadn't cleared the names with him. he didn't know all the people, and he was not happy. but he gave brief remarks
governance, the latest of which was held at the wilson center in june on science and technology innovation. these symposia, which the institute co-chairs with china's state council, not only promote dialogue among stakeholders, but also allow participants to develop personal connections. the institute also recently released an initial report on u.s./china security perceptions, another big project we're working on with leading research institutions in the u.s. and beijing. and just last week we published sustaining u.s./china cooperation in clean energy, an overview of the difficulties both countries face in developing solar, wind and other alternative energy industries and the potential room for cooperation. last innovate, finally -- november, finally, henry participated in another one of our national conversations entitled afghanistan: is there a regional end game. the back story on this is interesting. he resisted when he learned that we had organized a brilliant panel of scholars and reporters to comment on his remarks. we hadn't cleared the names with him, he didn't know all the people
the most government funded research to push the boundaries of science and technology so our best innovators and the entrepreneurs could pluck them and start these companies. if you think about that is a formula for success, and education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming out of high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers we are now $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration we have a policy to get a great education and then get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h-1b issues that are so vital for our future strength. fourth, the rules for incentivizing risk-taking and preventing recklessness. i don't think that we have in any way remedied that the way we want and on the government funded research if it looks like an ekg heading for a heart attack. i don't know if they are relative to what. all i know is in the things that have historically made us great, on each one of those i see us not g
finance the transcontinental railroad. let's start the national academy of sciences. let's start the land grant colleges because we want to give the gateway if they are giving opportunity we are all going to be better off. that doesn't restrict people's freedom, that enhances it. so what i have tried to do as president is to apply the same principles. >> that's president obama from the debate this week on the role of government. now let's listen to his challenger, mitt romney, with his answer to that question. >> first, life and liberty. we have a responsibility to protect the life and liberty of our people and that means military second to none. i do not believe in cutting the military. i believe in maintaining the strength of america's military. second, in the line that says we are in doubt by our creator with rights i believe we must maintain our commitment to religious tolerance and freedom in this country. that statement also says that we are endowed by our creator with a right to pursue happiness as we choose. i interpret that as one, making sure those are less fortunate and can't c
as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bart is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership is part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. william kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard," which he cofounded in 1995. purchaser is not view of the project for the republican future. he also served as chief of staff to vice president quayle and secretary of education, bill bennett. he also served to john mccain. all of these t-bill regularly on fox news sunday in the fox news channel. i actually met ellen 1981 when he was a very young assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. it's been great to see all the things he's accomplished since that time. so the question i would like to pose for each of you, and i'll start with governor huntsman. what does the 2012 election reveal about the respective leadership styles of obama and romney? >> probably not much. >> okay, what this panel -- >> see you later. >> you can extrapolate a few things from president obama's first term that might be instructive. he isn't
. and that is what is missing from this. there is no penalty. this isn't rocket science. you can just easily say, the classic case now is they have it sitting there and they've offered to pay 5%. can you imagine going into irs and saying, here's what i'm going to pay you this year. just give me a pass on this. give you 5%. ain't going to happen. the multinational corporations happen every day and it is just as dishonest as they get comic. >> host: the point you make is so true. in 2003, congress succumbed to the argument was out of money, corp. of money sitting offshore. we'll pay kind of a token tax year. the whole purpose was supposedly to create jobs. well, later reports have disclosed that the companies that brought back the most money cut jobs, did not actually create jobs. so even when these things are put in place, there's no follow-up to enforce that means some penalty. >> well, it brings us back to a human model and politics because were in the midst of a political campaign. you talk about how the rich view of money and taxes than a dollar bill differently than working and middle-class
the most government funded research fop push out the boundary of science and technology our best innovators and entrepreneurs can pluck them and start the new company. it you think about that as the formula for success an education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high schools drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming to high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to american society of civil engineers we're $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration, we have a policy now that basically says here come here get a great education and get the hell of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h1b issues that are vital phenomena the future strength. fourth the rules for incentive risk taking and recklessness. i don't think we have em i didded to the degree we want. on government funded research if you see in the gap it looks like ekg heading for heart attack. i don't know relative to what all i know in terms of the things that historically made us great, on each one of those, i see us not going in the direction we shou
in the science and in the super committee and that template is you have to do a large amount of spending reforms. assemble lectures on the route to higher revenue tax reform. you just have to follow that template and we would get to wherever need to to go. >> diane, what to make of this baseline issue? >> wow, i'm it is sad we have to rely on actually going over the cliff to stick to the current law baseline. that is my main reaction to it. and now, i think that it is too bad that it's been so hard to raise revenues because of the pledge. i think especially given that there's so many ways of raising tax revenues. so it goes back to my hope, that we can somehow get a budget process in place that honors the current law baseline, today's current law baseline and stick to it more aggressively. >> if i could just make one budget comment, which understand the question is about politics, but as officially scored in the joint on tax cbo, for example you made a policy that would extend permanently half of the tax in the fiscal cliff, because they're not to happen, that would be scored as a tax cut in the
and every like to possessors of political science speculating in the abstract about the nature of international politics. you may wonder why it was because of fact the only thing worth talking about was at that point whether we could establish enough confidence between the two of us to risky adventure that opening to china representative for both sides shown that point of view, from a domestic, political point of view. and even though the subject of president nixon to china, was the reason why i came, neither side mentioned it until about 12 hours before. i mention not only to say i believe it should be followed to get your object it straight before you start haggling about details. we had no choice. now every generation and then was a great reform and i cannot think of any other country where you could definitely say that the evolution that we have seen in the last 30 years, depending on the vision of one man, as in the case of no other chinese who had the vision and the courage to move china into the imaginative system and to engage the reform and instituting a market system.
." brigid callahan harrison, professor of political science at state university. herb jackson, washington correspondent for the record hurt and my colligan chief clinical correspondent for njtv. we have questions reported earlier by the news director of wbgo-fm, doug doyle, which is seen throughout the broadcast. here's the rules throughout the debate. each candidate will have 90 seconds for an opening and closing statement in a show of 60 seconds to answer questions from our panel. then move onto the next question. there is a timing light here to keep us on schedule. it is my job to try and force that. the audience has promised once again to make my job a bit easier and show proper respect to the candidates by holding their applause until we have this broadcast. it conducted during the conversation during the broadcast come you can follow us on twitter using the hash tag and jay debate. let's begin. we tossed a coin. senator kyrillos goes first. kyrillos: mike, thank you very much and to njtv and montclair state for this debate. you know, i love this country. i love america. all of us ar
harrison, professor political science at my here at montclair state university. herb jackson, washington correspondent for the record. and my colleague, michael aron for njtv. we have questions reported earlier by the news director of wbgo-fm, doug doyle throughout the court pass. here are the rules. each candidate was 90 seconds for an opening and closing statement and each will have 60 seconds to answer questions for our panel. then we will build onto the next question. there is a title like that keeps us on schedule and it is my job to try to enforce a timing light. the audience has promised once again can make my job a bit easier and show proper respect to candidates by holding a pause until we end this broadcast. if you'd like to join the conversation during the broadcast, follow us on twitter using the hash tag mj debate. we tossed a coin. senator kyrillos goes first. your opening statement. kyrillos: mike, thank you very much. thank you to the record at montclair state and you senator menendez for this debate. you know, i love this country. i love america. all of us are blessed to
there's history, social studies, science and not part -- >> don't forget band and trauma. >> for their informed citizens what can our organization do more about that? islamic school boards often times dictate the curriculums and what kind of history is being taught and if the teaching african american history starting with 1865 and abraham lincoln on through and that's all you get about the black folks and the latino history starts with i don't know, 2006. that is how some of these issues are being framed. you get these type of - out there and you're wondering why your kids are not worried about this will involve or understand the history and why the need to be involved. it wasn't until the senator was in the united states senate he said before it was the first republican reconstruction and texas. the way the republicans took over the state of texas the first ran for the state board of education. democrats totally overlooked it. what they recognized was this was pure politics. they looked at the election and they saw how many it took to win the seats in the previous elect
. and so, you know, eventually i ended up in you see santa barbara as a student of political science. i think having grown up rural and kind kind of small, i guess i never imagined i could work in the white house or be part of the political campaign like the obama campaign. so i always coming in now, i was let the chance to do is talk like this because i hope there is something a mystery that might be inspiring as you allege are your success. and i think washington d.c. was for me on the other side of the road when i was going up but i know the world is smaller now and more accessible. but i think we can dream big dreams as my boss likes to tell me. my old boss likes of tommy. so we are going to talk about kind of my path to the white house. just quickly though, so i like to say that everything i learned about winning and success they learned on the campaign trail. there is always a winner and a loser. the political environment, just like the business world is highly competitive. and with every campaign season, there's always innovation incubators if you will. and so, guess the campaign
of the house, science, space, and technology committee as well as a confer rei on -- conferee on the faa committee, i realize making the skies safer, less congested, and cleaner requires substantial investments. we must invest in the future, but we have to invest wisely. i'm concerned with the department of transportation, inspector general's april 2012 # report that the en route implementation schedule slipped by four years, and over budgeted by $330 million. in addition, i understand that although progress is being made, the agency has had difficulties in developing performance metrics for next generation goals. i want to thank you chairman petri and ranking member costillo, for holding the hearing, and i look forward to the testimony of the witnesses today because i believe we have to implement the next generation technology. thank you, and i yield back. >> thank you, and now we turn to the first panel, and i'd like to welcome the honorable john portcari, the u.s. secretary of the department of transportation, the acting administrator of the faa. welcome to both of you, and our regula
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)

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